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Saturday, January 19, 2013

Newspaper Bigfoot Column


We live in an age of information, perhaps too much information, some claim. The Internet comes instantly to mind.  Even as the Internet and computers became common in homes around the planet, we were sternly warned to be careful of the information found there. One reason for the warning:  it was now possible for any and everyone to contribute their opinions, their expert knowledge─whether expert or not.  And, the ease and ability to publish under the moniker Anonymous has added greatly to the unreliability of Internet gleaned information.

And so, with Internet information we are burdened with the added responsibility of time-gobbling research, just to get to the truth of a subject. I’m guessing most of us do not take our valuable time to do it. And where does this leave us in regard to this amazing tool the Internet and its information fount? If I were to guess, I’d say, we each believe what we want to believe. And so, since we all have our own beliefs on all subjects the world is NOT a more enlightened place because of it. (I think!) I would like to say, at this point, if a subject is important to you, please do the necessary research to find the truth. Do not let others do your thinking! And here’s a good one: Don’t believe everything you read!

My husband and I author an online bigfoot magazine, Bigfoot Ballyhoo (www.bigfootballyhoo.blogspot.com). I search the Internet for information on bigfoot and its impending “discovery.” I’ve received many bigfoot sightings which have been archived for all to read on the site. For a time, I was privy to follow and communicate with a bigfoot discovery team (ESP Team) as they worked in the forest to film and see firsthand a huge bigfoot that they’ve named Big Clyde. Last week a member of this team, Cole Saxton, gave a presentation to a class of seventh graders. Two students of this class sent Ballyhoo  reports which were published. Both students enjoyed the presentation. Saxton let them compare their feet to the plaster cast of a bigfoot and shared photos with them of a bigfoot (not Big Clyde). Evidently, Saxton believes that bigfoots can be dangerous if shot at or threatened. He recommended to always be aware of ones surroundings when enjoying the forests and woods. And this, readers, sounds like good advice, information that is not to be doubted even though published on the Internet. Until next week, Linda Newton-Perry with Christopher Perry

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